Digestion, indigestion, and the science of the alimentary canal

alimentary canalMary Roach is a funny person, and I mean that in both senses of the word: funny ha-ha, and funny strange. For years now, she’s been writing amusing and often hilarious popular science books about peculiar subjects, including cadavers, the afterlife, the science of sex, life in space, and, now, digestion. Somehow, other science writers have tended to shy away from these topics. (I wonder why?)


Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal by Mary Roach

@@@@ (4 out of 5)


So, now, Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal. 

You can get a pretty good sense of what Gulp is like by reading the table of contents. Check out these chapter titles, for example:

  • The Longest Meal: Can thorough chewing lower the national debt?
  • Spit Gets a Polish: Someone ought to bottle the stuff
  • A Bolus of Cherries: Life at the oral processing lab
  • Big Gulp: How to survive being swallowed alive
  • Dead Man’s Bloat: And other diverting tales from the history of flatulence research

Got the picture? Good. But don’t get the impression that Gulp is just a funny book. It’s chock full of important information as well. For instance:

  • You’ll learn about the difference between a $500 bottle of wine and one that costs $30.
  • You’ll find out what Eskimos think of cats.
  • You’ll know the difference between laundry detergent and the digestive juices in your stomach.
  • You’ll learn which end of the cow its farts come out of.
  • You’ll find out how Elvis Presley, President James Garfield, and Farrah Fawcett really died.

Gulp brims over with surprises. And the truly funny thing is, you’ll actually learn a good deal about the digestive process along the way. Mary Roach knows her stuff. This book is far more than a comic tour de force: it’s actually a superior example of science journalism. Kudos to Mary Roach!

About the author

Gulp is Mary Roach’s sixth book-length study. The first was Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers a decade ago. Then two years later came  Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife, and Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex three years after that. Her most recent book before Gulp was Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void in 2010. 

For further reading

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